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  • Ethiopia's government says GERD construction is half way complete

    Construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance dam is more than half-way complete. A meeting between Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan in Khartoum earlier in the week selected an international consultant to study the impact that construction of the dam would have on the economies of the three economies. Ethiopia maintains that the dam will supplement electricity production and will not have any negative effect on the neighbouring countries. CCTV's Girum Chala with the update.

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  • Refugee crisis: Plan to create 100,000 jobs in Ethiopia - BBC


    Britain, the European Union and the World Bank have announced a plan to create 100,000 jobs in Ethiopia to help tackle the migrant crisis.

    Two industrial parks will be built in the country at a cost of $500m (£385m).

    Ethiopia, which proposed the plan, will be required to grant employment rights to 30,000 refugees.

    UK Prime Minister Theresa May said the project would be a model for how to support poorer countries housing large numbers of migrants.

    Ethiopia hosts more than 700,000 asylum seekers, mainly from South Sudan, Eritrea and Somalia.

    Source: BBC

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  • Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan sign final contracts on Nile dam studies

    (Reuters) – Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia commissioned studies into the environmental and economic impact of a $4 billion dam on the Nile that Addis Ababa aims to make the centerpiece of its bid to become Africa’s biggest power exporter.

    The 6,000-megawatt Grand Renaissance Dam, situated close to Ethiopia’s border with Sudan and being built by Italy’s largest construction firm Salini Impregilo SpA, is due for completion next year.

    It has become a bone of contention between Ethiopia and Egypt, downstream from the dam and relying almost exclusively on the Nile for agricultural, industrial and domestic water use.

    Addis Ababa has complained Cairo has pressured international donors and lenders to withhold funding for the project, while Egypt has sought assurances the dam will not significantly cut the flow of water to its rapidly growing population.

    Egyptian state news agency MENA said the two countries plus Sudan signed contracts on Tuesday tasking two French firms, BRL and Artelia, with conducting studies into the dam’s impact.

    Gilles Rocquelain, BRL Director General, said the studies would start in late 2016 and take 11 months.

    The leaders of the three countries signed a co-operation deal in Khartoum last year to pave the way for a joint approach to regional water supplies.

    In all, Ethiopia plans to spend some $12 billion on harnessing its rivers for hydro power production in the next two decades.

    Source: Reuters

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  • Egypt, Sudan & Ethiopia to sign dam impact studies contract this week

    Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia are set to sign the contracts with two foreign consultancy firms hired to study the impact of Ethiopia’s Grand Renaissance Dam (GERD) on downriver countries on 19-20 Sept in Khartoum, Egypt's irrigation ministry spokesman announced Saturday.

    In statements to the state-owned MENA news agency, ministry spokesman Waleed Haqiqi said that the irrigation ministers of the three countries would sign the contracts in Sudan during the 12th meeting of the trilateral committee.

    The newly announced dates for signing the contracts comes following a series of delays.

    The delays were partly caused by "outstanding issues between the consultancy firms [BRL and Artelia] which are conducting the technical studies and the legal firm wording the contracts,” Egypt’s irrigation ministry has previously said.

    The postponment also resulted from delays by Khartoum in granting entry visas to Sudan for firms' experts, according to the Egyptian ministry.

    In March 2015, Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan signed a trilateral declaration of principles that guarantees that all parties will take steps to ensure the Grand Ethiopian Dam would not harm the interests of any of the parties concerned.

    Cairo previously expressed concerns that Ethiopia’s $4.2 billion dam could affect its historical share of Nile water, but has recently said it is sure the construction of the dam would not negatively impact Egypt.

    Addis Ababa has maintained that the dam project, which Ethiopia needs to generate electicity, would not affect harm downstream countries.

    Source: Ahram Online

    Amharic video: Ethiopia Makes Progress on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam Project

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